Monday, December 17, 2007

Why I hate Gnome...

I have been using GNOME for over 7 years now, and feel that with every release it gets more unstable, buggy and bloated. Good features get removed or reimplemented in some horribly broken form. Or they just mess around with sane default settings (see Always Open in Browser windows to Windows 95 style open a new window for each browser). Sometimes they hide the icons, the trash can, the delay settings... and they so love to complicate the configuration files. But now....

It looks like GNOME is desperately trying to become the new "Microsoft BOB":

Bug 324253 – "New document" and "Open terminal" non active by default in context menu


- "Open terminal" is frustrating (and scary) for users not knowing what to do with a terminal, the vast majority of GNOME users nowadays. If anybody needs to open a terminal there is an easy way to do so through Applications. If really needed, the user could activate this preference from Preferences.

Yes people, that is why the right click - open terminal shortcut was REMOVED from Gnome 2.14 and later. It's a BUG since it SCARES away users. Boooo.. and now you need to install a "plugin" like nautilus-open-terminal. WTF. Yes, all users must be retarded, let's remove a useful feature...

Linus Torvalds had some things to say about Gnome too:

"This 'users are idiots, and are confused by functionality' mentality of Gnome is a disease. If you think your users are idiots, only idiots will use it. I don't use Gnome, because in striving to be simple, it has long since reached the point where it simply doesn't do what I need it to do."

Where Gnome aims to be in 5 years:



// Sorry for the rant, but I just had to get his off my chest... I miss Sawfish :-(.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

ROTFL. If i'm forced to use a desktop environment (they all suck), i certainly prefer KDE because they at least have tons of useful knobs and the stuff i want...

Anonymous said...

Use Sawfish then, I believe it's still mantained :)

Tom said...

Wow ... you have said exactly what I would have said. If I had a blog. (And this is why I don't have a blog -- the world doesn't need yet another blog saying the same things as all the other ones.)

I quit using GNOME and switched to KDE about a year ago, after being a staunch GNOME supporter for years. Hiding and obfuscating config files, removing useful features, making everything less flexible over time instead of more ... GNOME has gotten a very Microsoftish attitude, seemingly saying, "We have scientifically determined that this is the best user interface, so we'll make it the only one available."

Where they seem to differ from Microsoft is that M$ says, "You can customize the user interface with this optional add-on package for only $49.95", while GNOME says, "We haven't had time to write any usable UI customization tools -- you can use gconf-editor and change the undocumented options there if you want, or you can edit the undocumented XML config files whose formats we'll change next version."

GNOME is not for me anymore.

markslashbill said...

I use sawfish.
and Rox-filer.
no bloat, and fast.
KDE4 sucks 3.x was OK
Gnome, is, just, unspeakable.

Vis said...

I left Gnome after installing Fedora 15, where Gnome3 became the default. It is unusable without hardware graphics acceleration, and I ran it from virtual machines and VNC, and so hardware acceleration was not available. It was the best thing that has happened to me in a long time. It is as if I rediscovered my love of Unix. I have moved to xmonad and largely left my mouse behind, and now I am way more efficient. That is when it hit me, with Linux nobody is really in control telling you how you have to do things (I'm looking at you Steve Jobs, RIP), so people are free to experiment with new use-models. Microsoft and Apple have to build an environment for novices, but with xmonad I have found an alternative environment that provides real productivity, and all I have to do is invest a little time learning it, which is a great trade-ff for me, and one that is simply not available from Microsoft or Apple. Clearly Gnome wants to be the Linux environment for novices, and I appreciate that. I just wish it would be a bit more of a team player. It would be good if Gnome would make it easier for people to grow out of it. For example, it would be good if it provided command line alternatives to its utilities (nm) and also made it easy to determine the name of the command line equivalent. Now it seems as if Gnome is written by people that cannot conceive of someone not wanting to use Gnome, and that is its problem. Oh, and their infatuation with the Apple 'lowest-common denominator' philosophy is just nuts, and not in the spirit of the Unix tradition. You get the impression that they simply want to be the open-source version of Apple's OS. They should set their sites higher

Vis said...

I left Gnome after installing Fedora 15, where Gnome3 became the default. It is unusable without hardware graphics acceleration, and I ran it from virtual machines and VNC, and so hardware acceleration was not available. It was the best thing that has happened to me in a long time. It is as if I rediscovered my love of Unix. I have moved to xmonad and largely left my mouse behind, and now I am way more efficient. That is when it hit me, with Linux nobody is really in control telling you how you have to do things (I'm looking at you Steve Jobs, RIP), so people are free to experiment with new use-models. Microsoft and Apple have to build an environment for novices, but with xmonad I have found an alternative environment that provides real productivity, and all I have to do is invest a little time learning it, which is a great trade-ff for me, and one that is simply not available from Microsoft or Apple. Clearly Gnome wants to be the Linux environment for novices, and I appreciate that. I just wish it would be a bit more of a team player. It would be good if Gnome would make it easier for people to grow out of it. For example, it would be good if it provided command line alternatives to its utilities (nm) and also made it easy to determine the name of the command line equivalent. Now it seems as if Gnome is written by people that cannot conceive of someone not wanting to use Gnome, and that is its problem. Oh, and their infatuation with the Apple 'lowest-common denominator' philosophy is just nuts, and not in the spirit of the Unix tradition. You get the impression that they simply want to be the open-source version of Apple's OS. They should set their sites higher.